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Children FAQ

Why are baby teeth important?

Primary, or baby teeth, are important to aid your child in chewing, speaking, and providing a path for the permanent teeth.
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My child sucks on her thumb or pacifier, do I need to make him/her stop?

If your child is sucking on a thumb or finger, it is important to try to encourage them to stop. The habit of thumb or finger sucking can become a life-long habit with detrimental effects on the permanent teeth. If your child is using a pacifier, they will normally stop on their own or before the permanent teeth begin to erupt. Your dentist may need to take steps to help your child stop habits as their permanent front teeth begin to appear. Pacifier habits are much easier to break. 
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Are dental x-rays safe?

Dental radiographs are very safe for your child. The amount of radiation is properly calibrated to your child’s size. A lead apron and devices on the x-ray machine are used to limit radiation exposure to your child. 
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What are dental sealants?

Sealants are a protective material placed on children’s permanent molars to aid in cleansing these teeth. The biting surfaces of molars often have deep grooves, which allow food and bacteria to collect. A manual toothbrush cannot clean these grooves effectively. A sealant will fill these grooves to allow your child to clean properly and prevent cavities. 
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What happens if one of my child’s teeth gets knocked out?

If it is a primary tooth, do not attempt to place the tooth back in the child’s mouth. See your dentist for a follow-up appointment. If it is a permanent tooth, immediately place the tooth back in its socket in the child’s mouth. If you cannot replace the tooth, place it in a container of milk, and see your dentist as soon as possible. 
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Does my child need protection of his/her teeth during sports?

Yes, custom mouth guards can be made for your child to wear during sporting events. Mouth guards have been shown to protect your child’s teeth, and also aid in preventing concussions. 
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Will my child need braces?

The dentist will continually evaluate your child’s teeth and bone structure as they develop. The dentist will make suggestions for your child’s possible orthodontic treatment as needed. 
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